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Posted by on Nov 24, 2011 in Around Dublin, Artist's Eye, Belfast, Dublin, Families, Historic, History, Language, Music, Northern Ireland | 8 comments

Ten Websites We’re Thankful For…

Love ItIt’s Thanksgiving in the US, and we picked ten sites for which we’re especially thankful. Each site has proven to be committed to celebrating their passion for Ireland… and contributing to a wonderful year.

B&B Ireland Blog – This newcomer to the blog scene has become a consistent source for authentic Irish travel information. Check it out.

Bitesize Irish Gaelic Blog – For those interested in learning the Irish language, these folks keep everything fun and informative. Be sure to sign up for their e-newsletter.

Discover Ireland Blog – Since it’s launch, Irish tourism’s official blog has been providing a steady stream of original articles covering every corner of the Emerald Isle.

Diddlyi Magazine – Centered around the Irish dance community, Diddlyi also gives a generous helping of Irish culture and history.

Engaging Ireland Podcast – Their latest audio episodes visit Northern Ireland, but their archives give great tips for sites all over Ireland.

In Your Pocket Belfast and In Your Pocket Dublin – these sister publications have both capital cities covered.

Ireland Yes – When it comes to travel forums, Michele and her online community have answers for everything you want to know about Ireland. And her book is a hit as well.

Ireland with Kids – This site goes beyond family travel in Ireland and offers suggestions everyone can use.

Irish and Celtic Music Podcast – Irish Music! Celtic Music! Need I say more?

Married an Irish Farmer – We’re still charmed by Imen’s accounts of life on an Irish farm… and her site is loaded with delicious recipes from the countryside.

Irish Culture and Customs – Bridget has compiled a veritable encyclopedia of information on Ireland. Click around and you’ll love what you find.

Looking for a few more sites of interest. Visit our Links Page.

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8 Comments

  1. Aww, shucks Corey, thanks so much for the mention! You know yourself, though, there’s so much to cover when you talk ireland that we couldn’t possibly run out of things to say! Huge thank you on thanksgiving day for the mention.
    Cheers
    lisag

  2. Corey, you’re too kind! We’ve had good fun speaking with you during the year, and moreover, I’ve the utmost respect of the amount of quality content you guys share here on Irish Fireside.

  3. Thanks, Corey. You have been so supportive of my site this year I can’t thank you enough!

  4. And I am thankful for Irishfireside.com!

  5. Corey,

    Thanks for the mention. You are are always tops with me!

    Michele

  6. Hmm… I wasn’t aware there is such a thing as “Irish Gaelic.” People, let’s get this straight: The language is just called Irish. In England they speak English, in Spain they speak Spanish, in France they speak French and in Ireland they speak Irish. They don’t speak Gaelic. Ask any native Irish speaker in Connemara, “What language do you speak at home?” and they will answer, “Irish.” Nobody will ever tell you, “I speak Gaelic.” Sorry that’s just a pet peeve of mine.

    Anyway, if you want to learn Irish, go for it! These are two sources that have really helped me:

    1. Buntus Cainte — get it on Amazon. It comes with a booklet and 2 CDs. You can hear people pronounce the words in an Ulster accent, which is probably a good accent for learners. It is considered a more ‘crisp’ accent. The chapters tell a story about a family and use common sentences about things you might expect to find in everyday life: words for the kitchen, words for travelling, etc.

    2. RosettaStone Learn Irish — yes it is expensive, but this is a FANTASTIC computer program. RosettaStone has kind of a flash-card-with-context approach to teaching. You learn words and then how to put words together in the context of a situation. For example, first you learn the words for “table, cup, over, under.” Then you learn how to say, “The cup is over the table,” or “The cup is under the table.” It is a more natural way to learn a language than simple memorisation and drills.

  7. Hi Corey

    Thanks for mentioning our blog. We are really enjoying writing our blog and thankful that visitors find it entertaining and useful. It has been a very positive move for B&B Ireland and our goal is to help our B&B guests feel welcome and to make Ireland a real Irish family experience.

    Many thanks,
    Joy

  8. Lots of great sites there to explore Irishness.

    For those of you in the baby mode and looking for an Irish name for your baby you might be interested in my site irish-baby-names.com (especially if you’re looking for something more unusual than ‘Colleen’!)

    I’m off to check out the travel with kids one…

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  1. Five Websites We’re Thankful For | Irish Fireside - [...] looking for more? Check out last year’s list… or check out the premier online issue of Isle [...]
  2. Eight Websites We’re Thankful For | Irish Fireside - […] looking for more? Check out the 2012 list or the 2011 […]

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